Monthly Archives: October 2011

The Birth of JIDC…A new kind of Journal

In the beginning . . . there was . . . an Idea . . . JIDC

There is an old saying that “Success has a thousand mothers and failure has none”. JIDC, I am proud to say, has thousands of mothers, fathers, sons and daughters. Truly, thousands. The success is of JIDC is the fruit of the dedication and hard work of editors, mentors, proofreaders, page setters, reviewers, web designers, web wizards, translators,  and of course the authors who contribute their precious work to JIDC.

Interestingly, I am frequently asked how JIDC began. In a way it began overlooking a mountain in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, in May of 2006. A great number of my associates were attending a meeting—the first International Meeting of Infectious Disease in Central Asia, in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. We had many intense discussions on the problems facing scientists from developing countries attempting to publish in predominantly western journals and from these discussions evolved the unorthodox idea of a journal that was dedicated to scientists and infectious disease in developing countries.

Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan AdvanTours Photo

Many of us had long recognized that scientists and infectious disease science from developing countries were dramatically underrepresented in journals published in western countries. The underlying  science from infectious disease clinicians and scientists, we believed, was of a high calibre, but often the writing and presentation within manuscripts were not.  The solution, we summarized, in the majestic scenery of Bishkek, was to provide assistance in the writing and presentation of data for scientists’ draft JIDC manuscripts.  We thus added to JIDC a mentor system to guide and aid authors from developing countries with both writing skills and manuscript organization.

But alas, finances presented the greatest hurdle for scientists to publish and for the JIDC to function. Many journals require a payment of sorts to be made for accepted manuscripts to be published. The average going rate of $3,000 USD in western journals is manageable by western scientists, but the amount is simply out of the reach for many scientists and clinicians in developing countries. In fact, this may represent nearly one half a year’s wages in some developing countries. The JIDC, we declared, must be free of fees for those who cannot afford them. JIDC today is open access, free to submit, and the publication fee is waived for those who cannot afford the modest fee of 200 euros. The financial burden of maintaining JIDC is shouldered by volunteers of JIDC and grants from foundations and organizations such as the Foundation of Bank of Sardinia, Sardegna Ricerche, the University of Sassari, Shantou University Medical College, the Li Ka Shing Foundation, and the University Health Network in Toronto, Canada. Our heartfelt gratitude goes out to these people and organizations.

Through the months and years that followed the Bishkek meeting, JIDC was able to attract the dedicated team that now manages submitted manuscripts, reviews manuscripts, edits manuscripts, and publishes papers. The success of JIDC is the success of the many people who have joined in this exciting and rewarding journey! As we look forward to our fifth an

niversary in 2012, the future is in our hands and it is a glorious sunrise.

Salvatore Rubino, Editor in Chief humble servant…..

JIDC Website:  http://www.jidc.org/index.php/journal

JIDC Editorial Meeting 2011 in Stintino, Sardinia

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Thank You to Cameroon — Compliments on the JIDC Mentoring System

A couple of weeks ago, JIDC Editor-in-Chief Salvatore Rubino received a letter from a researcher in Cameroon.  The letter from Jane-Francis Akoachere of the University of Buea in Cameroon, described how the JIDC Mentoring System supports researchers in non-English speaking countries to communicate the research from their communities on an international level.

When the letter was received, everyone at JIDC especially E-in-C Salvatore Rubino was incredibly moved as the Mentoring is the HEART of JIDC.  The whole JIDC Editorial and Technical Staff wanted to show how important this letter was to us and say a big THANK YOU to Jane-Francis Akoachere.  It means more than can be expressed to have a reader communicating their gratitude.

So… Thank You Jane-Francis Akoachere and Cameroon from everyone at JIDC!

Here is  Dr. Jane-Francis Akoachere’s Letter:

Dear Dr Salvatore Rubino,

I was browsing through Scopus and came across JIDC for the first time. Out of curiosity, I did a Google search and got a write up (PDF document) on the mission and vision of JIDC. I salute the concern you and your team has shown  about scientists in developing countries and I earnestly thank you all for  drawing up such a project. Personally, I think I will benefit from the JIDC project because being linked to a mentor, will enable me polish up my writing skills and come up with good manuscripts.

Kindly extend my warm greetings, appreciation and best wishes to your entire team.

Jane-Francis Akoachere,
Coordinator for Microbiology Programme,
Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology,
Faculty of Science,
University of Buea,
Cameroon.

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WE ARE JIDC, The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries – An OA Journal with a Mentoring System!

WE ARE JIDC, The Journal of Infection in Developing Countries – Pleased to meet you!

We are JIDC, the Journal of Infection in Developing Countries.  We are an Open Access Journal and proud to be Open Access and participating in International Open Access Week.  Our non-for-profit journal publishes peer-reviewed papers focusing on medical and biomedical research studies that affect health and medicine in lower-income countries.  Research manuscripts can be in the form of research articles, case reports, and review articles.  Importantly, JIDC has developed a Unique Mentoring System to facilitate the publication of scientific articles in need of guidance in English editing and/or scientific direction.  Since all scientific research merits publication, it is JIDC’s mission to help develop scientific and medical studies into scientifically sound research articles by use of the mentoring system.  As scientific studies from all areas of the globe are published through JIDC we hope that JIDC becomes an intersection point of international science.  JIDC strives to be an international platform for the scientific interaction between the developed and developing worlds.

For more information on JIDC, please see the JIDC Journal Website!  Or more information can be found in our JIDC downloadable PDF document About JIDC.

Open Access and JIDC

Open Access!  We provide immediate open access of accepted papers on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge.  As an Open Access journal, JIDC provides all published articles freely available from our journal website.  The articles published in JIDC are  online from our journal website in PDF form that can then be downloaded for reading and sharing and referencing in future work.  The object of research is to increase knowledge of a particular subject. To conduct research but not to share the results, therefore, is to defeat its purpose.  The objective of JIDC is to allow researchers in all countries access to a high-quality international journal, not just to read, but more importantly, in which to publish research for others to read.

An International Journal!

As an international journal, publications are encouraged from laboratories from both developed and developing countries.  JIDC welcomes manuscripts from any country but particularly strives to provide all infectious disease researchers from developing countries with an international forum for publishing their research findings.  And together with our JIDC Blog it is also our hope that JIDC can be a platform for smaller research groups in developing countries to raise their profile and/or introduce them and their expertise to the research community. 

Who Are We?

JIDC was founded by Professor Salvatore Rubino of the University of Sassari in Sassari, Sardinia, Italy.  Professor Salvatore Rubino is an internationally renowned researcher in the field of Salmonella enteric and professor in the Department of Biomedical Sciences. 

We are an incredibly large group of co-operative scientists and clinicians that work together for the common goal that all research merits publication.  Under the direction of Salvatore Rubino there are 15 senior editors who are located across the globe:  Saudi Arabia, United States, Korea, Vietnam, Turkey, Bahrain, Zimbabwe, Hong Kong, China and the Netherlands.  Please see the regional offices for more information on your local JIDC branch.

In addition, there are 15 Editors, 11 Associate Editors, 1 Technical Editor, 9 Scientific Editors, 8 members of the Linguistics Division and an Extensive Editorial Board. 

Of course JIDC could not run without a webmaster, Marco Scano, who organizes the online technical aspects our monthly publication.  And creative designs including Journal Art Covers are done by Jeff Coombs.

More information on the Editorial Team of JIDC can be found here.

More about the Mentoring System

Mentoring is a necessary part of teaching and learning in the sciences and scientific research.  Most of us begin with an attempt to write our first paper, which is corrected by our supervisor and so the process begins.  We are all mentored, to a greater or lesser extent, in the art of getting papers accepted for publication.

Open Access Week Posts to come include an indepth look into the JIDC Mentoring System and the Importance of Open Access.

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JIDC Open Access Week Reception! Oct. 28th at 3pm

Hi everyone! Last week I mentioned that we were going to make an Open Access Week announcement this week. 

I am thrilled to announce that we will be hosting a JIDC Open Access Week Reception.  The reception is Friday, October 28th, 2011 at 3pm to 5pm in Toronto, Canada. 

To celebrate JIDC participation in Open Access Week we will be having food and drinks as well as JIDC and Open Access information.  Open Access Week is supported and organized by SPARC and PLoS.

If you are in the area and interested in attending, please contact me, Alyson Kelvin, at akelvin(at)jidc(dot)org or Marina Sequeira at  msequeir(at)uhnresearch(dot)ca

Alyson

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And the winner is….! JIDC Open Access Week #4

And the winner is….

I just couldn’t help it.  I have enjoyed Open Access Week and the JIDC T-shirt give-away that I could not just draw only 1 name.  So I picked 6!

 

The winners are:

Ashish Chandra Shrestha

Sarah Norris

Christopher Logue

Sunita Pareek

Marie Anne Chattaway

Chimwemwe Mandalasi

Please contact me at akelvin(at)jidc(dot)org and I will get the shirts sent out to you. 

Thanks everyone for your support of JIDC and your support of Open Access.  Next week I will be making an announcement regarding Open Access Week Events.  Look for the Post!

Nikki in her OA T!

I leave you with Nikki the Technical Editor at JIDC in her Open Access Week T!

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Yay! The JIDC shirt: Open Access Week Post #3

Yes it is HERE!  The JIDC T-shirt!  Unveiled for the up-coming Open Access Week.  Here it is:

 

The JIDC T-shirt is designed by JIDC’s own Creative Designer Jeff Coombs.    

This Friday we will announce the winners of the Open Access Week (OA Week) and the JIDC original design T-shirt giveaways.  To promote OA Week and JIDC Open Access participation, we are giving away OA Week T-shirts and JIDC T-shirts to JIDC Open Access Group Members.  For more information on joining, contact me (akelvin(at)jidc(dot)org) or see the previous OA post.  If you are interested in Open Access Week you can join on their website and see our JIDC Group Page.    Donna Okubo at PLoS and SPARC is also a great contact (dokubo(at)plos(dot)org).

I also mentioned that I will be posting pictures of JIDC editors and members in their OA Week T-shirts.  Today I am posting a photo of Tracy Zhao (Assistant Specialist for JIDC) supporting Open Access publishing.  My next OA post will have a picture of a JIDC Editor sporting this shirt.

 

OA Week (October 24th to 28th) is fast approaching and I am working hard to have some great OA posts for the JIDC Blog that week.  As described in my previous Open Access Week Post, there will be posts discussing the JIDC Mentoring Program, Scientific Writing, and the Importance of Open Access Publishing.  

My first OA post briefly describes the importance of Open Access for JIDC. 

I hope that you enjoy the Open Access activities as much as I have enjoyed preparing them!

Tracy in her Open Access T!

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Amber’s Pick: Light a candle

Hi everyone!  Amber has a very interesting edition of Editor’ Pick this month.  She has summarized three papers from the September issue.  This issue was dedicated to  Prof. Gianfranco Del Prete who was a prominent researcher in basic and clinical immunology with specific contributions in T cell immunology.  You can read a very special Editorial by Editor-in-Chief Salvatore Rubino dedicated to Pro. Gianfranco Del Prete in our September Issue.  Please enjoy her post!

Alyson 

Light a candle

While reading the current issue of JIDC, it was hard to select ONE paper for editor’s pick. Check out the JIDC’s September collection and you will find a feast of three excellent articles that cover many interesting aspects of plague.  The plague is a well-established biosecurity risk and one of the oldest diseases known that has claimed around 200 million human lives. According to estimates, bubonic (characterized by enlarged and tender lymph nodes), septecemic or pneumonic forms of plague cause up to 90% mortality in humans, if left untreated.

Yersinia Pestis Image from CDC Public Health Image Library

The etiologic agent of the disease, Yersinia pestis (Y. pestis) is a facultative intracellular bacterium which enters in the human body either by direct contact with infected rodents or by the bites of fleas that live on infected rodent bodies. Upon entry, the foreplay of Y. pestis through its unique signature LPS (LipoPolySaccharide (Endotoxin)) shuts down the TLR4 mediated activation of the proinflammatory host response and helps the bug to proliferate in phagocytic cells. Picture to the left from Public Health Image Library of Yersinia pestis.

In the article by Amedei et al., you will find the description of the exclusive interaction of Y. pestis with innate immune response. The authors further depict the augmented antigen presentation of the Yop proteins from Y. pestis that directly suppress T-lymphocyte activation which is pivotal to combat bacterial infections. A fine reading of T-cell mediated immunity, effector T-cell function, Th cytokine network and signaling pathways is contributed by Elios et al. The pictorial demos of the articles are just superb and help the readers to comprehend complicated stories. BTW I also love the color contrasts …

Figure 1 from D'Elios et al., JIDC 2011

Coming back to plague story, it’s very important to also be aware of disease prevention. In the third article, Sun et al. describe the issues related to the development of plague vaccines. They further discuss the pros and cons of vaccines that are presently under

Figure 1 from Sun et al., JIDC 2011

clinical trials and those that could be potential candidates in future. The authors also share their own experiences in their attempts to develop live attenuated vaccine using a genetically manipulated Y. pestis strain that does not express virulence genes in the challenging environment of host tissues.

Figure 2 from Sun et al., JIDC 2011

JIDC published these articles in memory of an eminent immunologist and a dear friend, Prof. Gianfranco Del Prete. His contributions to plague research were well received globally.

What could be better to paying tribute to a scientist than to remember him with more exciting scientific discussions! I am still thinking…..

Many people have said, “It’s better to light a candle than curse the darkness”. JIDC just did the same.

 

-Amber

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