Tag Archives: JIDC Review

Dr. Asghar Nazeer – A recent JIDC author!

One of the things I love about JIDC is that it brings together so many people from so many different countries and cultures. When I first started the JIDC blog, I invited everyone in the JIDC community to contribute posts in which they share their science experiences working in a culture different from their own. We’ve had some great posts about adventures in Brazil, China, Vietnam and other places. This week, I am pleased to share Dr. Asgar Nazeer’s story. He is an accomplished scientist and medical doctorand a recent JIDC author.  Dr. Nazeer’sPostcard reflects his life as a researcher as well as his personal values thathe carries through to his work.  It is this kind of spirit and caring that drive the dedication behind JIDC. His story is inspiring!

Alyson

Dr. Asghar Nazeer, MBBS, MPH, MHS, DrPH (Johns Hopkins)

Dr. Asghar Nazeer, together with Dr. Jaffar Al-Tawfiq, is the author of a review article “Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus metrics for patients in Saudi Arabia” published in the March issue of JIDC.  JIDC came to know that Dr. Nazeer has been selected as a Member under Spotlight for March 2012 by the Delta Omega Honorary Society in Public Health. He was originally inducted into the Delta Omega Honorary Society in Public Health, Alpha Chapter (the society’s founding chapter) in 1994 at Johns Hopkins University and elected as a Lifetime Member in 1995. He is a committed member of the Delta Omega Mentor Network. Dr. Nazeer has more than 27 years’ experience in public health, epidemiology, and clinical medicine. Over the course of his career, Dr. Nazeer has been at the forefront of public health practice. He has won several medals, honors and awards in his homeland and in the United States. JIDC blog therefore took the opportunity to invite him to share his story regarding how he started his career and how his education and research in Johns Hopkins University transformed his calling as a doctor.

Dr. Nazeer originates from Pakistan. He a was an outstanding student throughout his high school and college years and won National Talent Scholarships and three gold medals including a Prime Minister of Pakistan Gold Medal for his academic achievements. He graduated in 1983 from King Edward Medical University, the most prestigious school of medicine in Pakistan. He worked as a physician for five years in leading centers-of-excellence offering post-graduate training programs in medical specialties. He was commended as a physician by his patients, superiors, and colleagues and was concentrating in clinical cardiology for advanced certification. However, he was touched by the suffering of his patients and realized that “prevention is better than cure” is not just a cliché but a sound fact. Instead of dealing with the illness of one patient at a time, he thought he should serve populations at large by promoting health and preventing disease. He then decided to leave the lucrative career of a physician and voluntarily adopted public health as his calling to serve the humanity for the greatest good of the greatest number.

As his first public health assignment, he joined the Federal Ministry of Planning and Development, Pakistan, as Assistant Chief of Health Section in 1989 where he contributed to health policy formulation and health-care planning at the national level. He participated in planning, implementing, and evaluating nationwide projects focusing on prevention. In that capacity, he represented his Ministry in projects involving collaboration between the Government of Pakistan and international agencies such as the WHO, UNICEF, World Bank, UNICEF and USAID.

His academic excellence and extensive experience in health policy and planning contributed to his winning the internationally competitive World Bank Graduate Scholarship Program’s Fellowship for studies at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health where he earned MPH, MHS, and DrPH degrees. He won the Advising, Mentoring and Teaching Recognition Award, William H. Draper Fellowship, and Friends of International Health Student Scholarship Award and was inducted into Delta Omega Honorary Society in Public Health, Alpha Chapter.

After completing his coursework for the Dr PH degree at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Nazeer had to leave the USA to attend to his ailing mother, who relied on him for her care and companionship. Dr. Nazeer answered her call without hesitation and gave up chasing his American dream at a juncture when he was winning honors and awards on many fronts. With her consent, he moved to United Arab Emirates where his several siblings worked so that his family could reunite there.

Dr. Nazeer worked for the Federal Ministry of Health, United Arab Emirates, from June 1995 to December 2003 as Senior Public Health Specialist with the Policy and Projects Department. He was involved in several projects and policy initiatives and had the opportunity to collaborate with the World Bank, WHO and other agencies as one of the Ministry of Health’s team members.

He wrote an outstanding dissertation, by utilizing his weekends and vacations while working full-time, which was lauded by his academic and thesis advisors and the dissertation committee. His dissertation focused on developing algebraic methods for evaluating validity and reliability of diagnostic and screening tests from their agreement data in the absence of a gold standard. He applied those methods to cervical cancer screening data for comparing them with the conventional methods. Dr. Nazeer holds women and children’s rights and their health-care priorities in his highest regards. He accordingly named his dissertation as R and Z Conceptual and Analytical Framework as a tribute to his wife’s dedication and sacrifices and his autistic son’s angelic innocence by putting the initials of their names in his dissertation’s title. He truly believes that behind every successful man there is a woman and considers his wife, who is also a physician, as his best friend ever. He also commends the great sacrifices of his mother for supporting him in getting the best education and laying a strong foundation of his career.

Dr. Nazeer resigned from his position in Ministry of Health UAE in 2003 to take on a new assignment as Senior Epidemiology Specialist in the Preventive Medicine Services Division of Saudi Aramco Medical Services Organization. He is still working in the same organization.

In short, Dr. Nazeer graduated as a physician and practiced clinical medicine for five years. He then decided to become a public health professional and obtained his higher education from Johns Hopkins University. His first two years of education in Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health were funded by the World Bank Fellowship. He believes that the prayers and untiring support of his mother and his wife, the World Bank’s Fellowship, and studying at Johns Hopkins University transformed his life from a physician to an earnest public health professional who strives to serve the humanity at large on a population level rather than in a clinical setting. To contact him or learn more about his work, click to access his Linkedin profile.

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Filed under Pakistan, Postcards, USA

Birthdays, TB and Thank yous! JIDC News — January 2012

As you read last week, I am looking forward to New Science Year 2012.

One reason for my excitement is the January 2012 edition of JIDC, which is a special issue on TB. I will be featuring posts this month and in February on TB to coincide with the TB JIDC issue, including a TB post from Amber, our Editor’s Picks contributor.

This year also marks JIDC’s fifth birthday! Happy Birthday, JIDC! August 2012 will be the official anniversary of our first issue, which was published in August of 2007.

Editor-in-Chief Salvatore Rubino has written an excellent editorial on the five years of JIDC in the current January issue, which you can read here. In summary, Prof. Rubino describes the tremendous growth of JIDC as the journal moved from a bimonthly format to monthly format and notes our acceptance into PubMed in 2009 –  a major accomplishment that allows the articles by our authors to reach a wide professional audience.

Importantly JIDC could not function without the extraordinary contributions from scientists, writers, educators, health officials and students worldwide. There is no doubt that JIDC would not be as successful without these people.

Manuscript reviews are a critical component of a functioning scientific community. A reviewed and accepted manuscript signifies scientific studies and findings that have been acknowledged by experts in the field. As a scientist, having your work reviewed allows the perspectives of others to inform your work and identify possible flaws in the methods, results and/or interpretations. Reviewers’ suggestions and manuscript discussion can often lead to improved research since it is not always possible to have an unbiased view of your own work from the inside and out. We would like to thank everyone who contributed to the global scientific community by reviewing JIDC manuscripts in 2011. Below you can see that JIDC reviewers are international experts representing 65 countries acround the globe. I find this truly amazing.

Lorena Abadia-Patino (Venezuela) , Ibrahim Abdel-Messih (Italy), Yusuf Abdu Misau (Nigeria), Hikmate Abriouel (Spain), Ishag Adam (Sudan), Mohammad Aghasadeghi (Iran), Kabiru Akinyemi (Nigeria), Onoja Akpa (Nigeria), Bolajoko Aina (Nigeria), Raquel Almansa (Spain), Sitara Ajjampur (India), Carlos Alencar (Brazil), Abdulghani Alsamarai (Iraq), Patricia Agaba (Nigeria), Saurabh Agarwal (India), Deepak Aggarwal (United States), Jaffar Al-Tawfiq (Saudi Arabia), Carlos Amabile-Cuevas (Mexico), Malaka Amer (Saudi Arabia), Ben Amos (Tanzania), Vicente Antonello (Brazil), Maria Appleman (United States), Liana Ariza (Brazil), George Araj (Lebanon), Antonio Arbo (Paraguay), Carmen Ardanuy (Spain), Elisabete Arrese (Spain), Ifedayo Adetifa (Gambia), Samar Al-Nahhas (Syria), Ibrahim Al-Traif (Saudi Arabia), Jazzmin Arrivillaga (Venezuela), Myo Aung (Thailand), Reham A. Aziz (Egypt), Sina Aziz (Pakistan) Ahmed Al-Naaimi (Iran), Clement Azodo (Nigeria), Parisa Badiee (Iran), Ahmet Balik (Turkey), Frederick Baliraine (United States) , Kristin Banek (Uganda), Bita Bakhshi (Iran), Stephen Baker (Vietnam), Mustafa Bakir (Turkey), Fukai Bao (China), Oussama Baraket (Tunisia), Ladaporn Bodhidatta (Thailand), Andreas Baumler (United States), Wafaa Bakr (Egypt), Matteo Biasotto (Italy), Norma Binsztein (Argentina), Joseph Bliss (United States), Eve Boakes (United Kingdom), Steven Bosinger (United States), Giuseppe Botta (Italy), Zulkif Bozgeyik (Turkey), Maria Braoudaki (Greece), John Bremner (Australia), Rama Bhunia (India), Mathilde Boon (Netherlands), Franco Buonaguro (Italy), Cyrille Bisseye (Burkina Faso), Jorge Cabral (Portugal), Adrian Canizalez-Roman (Mexico), Jean-Philippe Chippaux (France), Andrea Carai (Italy), Nishat Chowdhury (Bangladesh), Lance Christiansen (United States), Phillip Collier (United Kingdom), Mauro Colombo (Italy), Daniela Ceccarelli (Italy), Solmaz Celebi (Turkey), Changfa (Clark) Cui (United States), Marie Chattaway (United Kingdom), Giancarlo Ceccarelli (Italy), Ricardo Correa (Panama), Carlos Canelo-Aybar (Peru), Nikoloz Chkhartishvili (Georgia), Rajesh Chudasama (India), Celso Cunha (Portugal), Nihar Dash (United Arab Emirates), Terezinha da Silva Leitao (Brazil), Monica da Silva-Nunes (Brazil), Barun Kumar De (United States), Monorama Deb (India), Debmita Debdas (India), Bouke De Jong (Belgium), Mireya de la Garza (Mexico), Giovanni Delogu (Italy), Jacobus de Waard (Venezuela), Elisa Deriu (United States), İlker Devrim (Turkey), Antonina Dolei (Italy), Gerusa Dreyer (Brasil), Maria Drogari-Apiranthitou (Greece), Milena Dropa (Brazil), Renu Dutta (India), Shanta Dutta (India), Mohamad Elsweify (Saudi Arabia), Atef El-Gendy (Egypt), Sabry El-Naggar (Egypt), Şevval Eren (Turkey), Abdul-Naser Elzouki (Libya), Teresa Estrada-Garcia (Mexico), Mônica Facanha (Brazil), Heriberto Fernandez (Chile), Joseli Ferreira (Brazil), Parissa Farnia (Iran), Mel Figtree (Australia), Joseph Forbi (Nigeria), Lucia Galli (Italy), R. Glenn Gaston (United States), Gerardo González-Rocha (Chile), P. Grabarczyk (Poland), Javier Garaizar (Spain), Marina Giuliano (Italy), Deniz Gur Akman (Turkey), Tayyaba Ijaz (Pakistan), Noyal Joseph (India), Yadav Prasad Joshi (Nepal), Wafa Habbal (Sirya), Xiang Han (United Stetes), Azian Harun (Malaysia) , Abdul Haque (Pakistan), Zahra Hasan (Pakistan), Mary Hoelscher (United States), Richard C. Huard (United States), Entesar Husain (Kuwait), Murat Kapan (Turkey), Ismail Kapicioglu (Turkey), Oguz Karabay (Turkey), Salim Abdool Karim (South Africa), Supaletchimi Katherason (Malaysia), Rumeyza Kazancıoğlun (Turkey), Adnan Khan (Pakistan), Karen Keddy (South Africa), Abdullah Kilic (Turkey), Paul Klatser (Netherlands), Diamantis Kofteridis (Greece), Michael Koster (United States), Anil Kumar (India), J. Labbe (New Caledonia), Lincoln Lau (Hong Kong), Sisinnio Leori (Italy), Benedikt Ley (Austria), Ming-Li Liou (Taiwan), Jean Limongi (Brazil), Amanda Loftis (Saint Kitts and Nevis), Zhigang Liu (United States), Chun-Yi Lu (Taiwain), Eric Macy (United States), Emin Maden (Turkey), Evelyn Madoroba (South Africa), Stanley Maloy (United States), Daniel Marcano (Venezuela), Margarita Martinez-Medina (Spain), Humphrey Mazigo (Tanzania), Jacobe Mathew (India), Mark Melzer (United Kingdom), Juliane Meng-Hentschel (Germany), Vitaliano Muzii (Italy), Lucky Moehario (Indonesia), Denise Patricia Mawili-Mboumba (Gabon), Leigh Miller (Thailand), Santosh Mondal (India), David Murdoch (New Zealand), Reggie Mutetwa (Zimbabwe), Nutan Mytle (USA), Joseph Mwanzia Nguta (Kenya), Gholamreza Nikbakht Brujeni (Iran), Vishal Nigam (India), Carla Novais (Portugal), Samuel Ola (Nigeria), Obeid Obeid (Saudi Arabia), A. B. Olokoba (Nigeria), Bianca Paglietti (Italy), Tibor Pal (United Arab Emirates), Dimple Panwar (India), Georgios Pappas (Greece), Violeta Pardío (Mexico), Luis Pianciola (Argentina), Ariel Pereda (Argentina), Alicia Perez (France), Celeste Pérez (Argentina), Cristian Perez (Costa Rica), Mrudula Phadke (India), Guillermo Pimentel (United States), Aggeliki Poulou (Greece), Farhad Pourfarzi (Iran), Audino Podda (Italy), Mayoor Prabhu (India), Pradyot Prakash (India), Zhikang Qian (United States), Manuela Raffatellu (United States), Md Siddiqur Rahman (Bangladesh), Paola Rappelli (Italy), Ayalu Reda (Ethiopia), Ana Carolina Ritter (Brazil), Octavio Rivero (Spain), Alesia Romanovkaya (Russia),Jane Rose (Saint Kitts and Nevis), Joaquim Ruiz (Spain), Suleiman Saidi (Kenya), Eisa Salehi (Iran), Sandeep Saluja (India), Vittorio Sambri (Italy), Amy Sapkota (United States), Sanda Sardelic (Croatia), Shiv Sarin (India), Murat Sayan (Turkey), Dianella Savoia (Italy), Karin Schwaiger (Germany), M Elena Seoane (Spain), Burcin Sener (Turkey), Asa Sjoling (Sweden), Abubaker Sidahmed (Canada), Nidhi Singla (India), Herman Sprenger (Netherlands), Ajanta Sharma (India), Seyed Davar Siadat (Iran), Addmore Shonhai (South Africa), Kirill Sharshov (Russia), VN Sehgal (India), Michael Seckeler (United States), Pierre Smeesters (Belgium), Malini Shariff (India), Wei Sun (United States), Olusegun Soge (United States), Bahman Tabaraie (Iran), Irene Tami (United States), Reda Tagajdid (Morocco), Narhari Timilshina (Canada), Mohammed Timinouni (Morocco), Eduardo Tondo (Brazil), Hasan Ucmak (Turkey), Uade Ugbomoiko (Nigeria), Kingsley Ukwaja (Nigeria), Maria Leide Wand-del-Rey Oliveira (Brazil ), Tjip van der Werf (Netherlands), A Veloo (Netherlands), Tommie Victor (South Africa), Roberto Vidal (Chile), Ha Vinh (Vietnam), Jugsharan Virdi (India), Simonetta Viviani (France), Georgia Vrioni (Greece), Richard Vincent (Madagascar), Francois-Xavier Weill (France), Hannah Wexlecheck (United States), Heather Williamson (United States), Paul-Louis Woerther (France), Asnakew Yeshiwondim (United States), Raffaele Zarrilli (Italy), Dominik Zenner (United Kingdom), Roberto Zenteno (Mexico), Abdulaziz Zorgani (Libya), Pablo Zunino (Uruguay).

And thanks to Editors of JIDC and technical staff including:

 Nikki Kelvin, Marco Scano, Joey Kelvin, Jeff Coombs, Giustina Casu, Nadia Ahmod, Eve Boakes, Mark Cameron, Cheryl Cameron, Antigoni Chaidaroglou, Marie Anne Chattaway, Daniela Chessa, Amber Farooqui, Katy Harker, Jorg Heukelbach, Richard C. Huard, Adnan Khan, Patrick J. Kelly, Gemma C Langridge, Asghar Nazeer, Alicia San José, Helena Seth-Smith, Chengming Wang, Aysegul Karahasan Yagci, Dominique China, Mark David Dickson, Emily Hiltz, Lisa M. Lambert, and Eva Molak.

 Special acknowledgement to Senior Editor Aysegul Karahasan Yagci!

We also thank the financial supports of JIDC.  Without financial support, JIDC could not exist:

Alyson

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Filed under Bacteria, Countries, Editor's Pick, Infectious Disease, JIDC News, Tuberculosis

Editor’s Pick by Amber: CMV – the SILENT RESIDENT

We are introducing a new regular section of the JIDC Blog entitled Editor’s Pick.  In this section JIDC Scientific Editor Amber Farooqui will choose an article from each month’s issue and give a short write-up to readers about the article.  Amber’s Pick for the August Issue is a Review Article from Jain and colleagues entitled “Cytomegalovirus infection in non-immunosuppressed critically ill patients.”  I am thrilled to have Amber as part of the JIDC Blog team and I look forward to reading her monthly picks.

Alyson

What if we don’t realize the silent resident!

Do “YOU KNOW WHO”? Who is that living among us?  Are we aware?………. Certainly, I am NOT talking about the apparitions, ghosts or Lord Voldemort. People like me have nightmares about the bugs that easily dodge the immune surveillance system of our bodies.  These immune invisible bugs can remain silent for long periods of time and include such viruses as Cytomegalovirus (CMV).

CMV Picture from NIST http://www.nist.gov

The CMV virus, which was discovered in 1921 as a cause of swollen cells, has now become an emerging health concern in immune-compromised individuals.  Due to the failure of the immune army to purge this virus, CMV poses serious health threats to HIV/AIDS patients and other immunocompromised individuals while silently enjoying the leisure of the immunocompetent bodies.

It is believed that CMV is ubiquitously present in all humans. The myth behind the latent infection is that the virus is able to impair antigen presentation in a variety of immune cell populations where pathogenic reactivation is believed to be triggered by immunosuppression. In recent years CMV reactivation has been widely observed in those debilitated patients who are categorized as immunocompetent by the hard-core definition, thus making clinical management more difficult. At this stage, it is difficult to determine how CMV reactivation occurs in such cases but the situation indicates that more people than previously thought are at risk of CMV reactivation.

Would you like to read more about CMV? This month JIDC delivers a  must-read review article by Jain et al. that summarizes the important aspects of CMV infection in non-immunosuppressed critically ill patients. The authors discuss the phenomena behind pathogenesis and host immune responses to the infection and provide a comprehensive review of clinicoepidemiological studies. You will also find a detailed discussion about the clinical management and diagnostic strategies of the infection.

H&E staining of lung sections by D Wiedbrauk, Ph.D., Ann Arbor, MI.
H E staining of lung sections by D Wiedbrauk shows CMV infection http://www.asm.org

Click here. Believe me; it’s worth reading this article.

Amber is from Karachi, Pakistan and she completed both her Bachelors of Science and PhD (2008) at the Karachi University.  She is now a Postdoctoral Scientist at the International Institute of Infection and Immunity in Shantou, China.  She is also a Scientific Editor for the Journal of Infection in Developing Countries.  Amber’s area of specialty is Influenza viruses and the host immune response. You can contact Amber at amberfarooqui@hotmail.com with any questions or comments.  She is always looking for scientific discussions!

Amber Farooqui

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Filed under Amber, CMV, Editor's Pick, JIDC News, People, Viruses